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L’Histoire de Mode~Haute Couture

Haute Couture

Haute couture (French for “high sewing” or “high dressmaking”) refers to the creation

of exclusive custom-fitted clothing. Haute couture is made to order for a specific customer,

and it is usually made from high-quality, expensive fabric and sewn with extreme attention

to detail and finished by the most experienced and capable seamstresses, often using

time-consuming, hand-executed techniques. Couture is a common abbreviation

of haute couture and refers to the same thing in spirit.

It originally referred to Englishman Charles Frederick Worth’s

work, produced in Paris in the mid-nineteenth century. In modern

France, haute couture is a “protected name” that can be used

only by firms that meet certain well-defined standards. However,

the term is also used loosely to describe all high-fashion custom-fitted

clothing, whether it is produced in Paris or in other fashion capitals such as

Milan, London, New York and Tokyo.

In France, the term haute couture is protected by law and is defined by

the Chambre de commerce et d’industrie de Paris based in Paris, France.

Their rules state that only “those companies mentioned on the list drawn up each year

by a commission domiciled at the Ministry for Industry are entitled to avail themselves”

of the label haute couture. The criteria for haute couture were established in 1945 and

updated in 1992. To earn the right to call itself a couture house and to use the term

haute couture in its advertising and any other way, members of the

Chambre syndicale de la haute couture must follow these rules:

  • Design made-to-order for private clients, with one or more fittings.
  • Have a workshop (atelier) in Paris that employs at least fifteen people full-time.
  • Each season (i.e., twice a year), present a collection to the Paris press, comprising at least thirty-five runs/exits with outfits for both daytime wear and evening wear.

However, the term haute couture may have been misused by

ready-to-wear brands since the late 1980s, so that its true meaning

may have become blurred with that of prêt-à-porter (the French term for

ready-to-wear fashion) in the public perception. Every haute couture house also

markets prêt-à-porter collections, which typically deliver a higher return on investment

than their custom clothing . Falling revenues have forced a few couture

houses to abandon their less profitable couture division and concentrate

solely on the less prestigious prêt-à-porter. These houses, such as

Italian designer Roberto Capucci, all of whom have their

workshops in Italy, are no longer

considered haute couture.

Many top designer fashion houses, such as Chanel, use the word for

some of their special collections. These collections are often not for sale or they

are very difficult to purchase. Sometimes, “haute couture” is inappropriately used to

label non-dressmaking activities, such as fine art, music and more.

French leadership in European fashion may date from the

18th century, when the art, architecture, music, and fashions

of the French court at Versailles were imitated across Europe. Visitors

to Paris brought back clothing that was then copied by local dressmakers.

Stylish women also ordered fashion dolls dressed in the latest Parisian fashion

to serve as models. As railroads and steamships made European travel easier,

it was increasingly common for wealthy women to travel to Paris to shop for clothing

and accessories. French fitters and dressmakers were commonly thought to be the best

in Europe, and real Parisian garments were considered better than local imitations.

The couturier Charles Frederick Worth (October 13, 1826–March 10, 1895),

is widely considered the father of haute couture as it is known today. Although

born in Bourne, Lincolnshire, England, Worth made his mark in the French

fashion industry. Revolutionizing how dressmaking had been previously perceived,

Worth made it so the dressmaker became the artist of garnishment: a fashion designer.

While he created one-of-a-kind designs to please some of his titled or wealthy customers,

he is best known for preparing a portfolio of designs that were shown on live models at the

House of Worth. Clients selected one model, specified colors and fabrics, and had a

duplicate garment tailor-made in Worth’s workshop. Worth combined individual

tailoring with a standardization more characteristic of the ready-to-wear clothing industry,

which was also developing during this period.

Following in Worth’s footsteps were Callot Soeurs, Patou,

Poiret, Vionnet, Fortuny, Lanvin, Chanel, Mainbocher, Schiaparelli,

Balenciaga, and Dior. Some of these fashion houses still exist today, under

the leadership of modern designers.

In the 1960s a group of young designers who had trained under

men like Dior and Balenciaga left these established couture houses and opened their

own establishments. The most successful of these young designers were Yves Saint Laurent,

Pierre Cardin, André Courrèges, and Emanuel Ungaro. Japanese native and Paris-based

Hanae Mori was also successful in establishing her own line.

Lacroix is one of the fashion houses to have been started in

the late 20th century. Other new houses have included Jean-Paul Gaultier

and Thierry Mugler. Due to the high expenses of producing haute couture

collections, Lacroix and Mugler have since ceased

their haute couture activities.

For all these fashion houses, custom clothing is no longer the main source of

income, often costing much more than it earns through direct sales; it only adds the a

ura of fashion to their ventures in ready-to-wear clothing and related luxury products

such as shoes and perfumes, and licensing ventures that earn greater

returns for the company. Excessive commercialization and profit-making can be

damaging, however. Cardin, for example, licensed with abandon in the 1980s and his name

lost most of its fashionable cachet when anyone could buy Cardin luggage at a discount store.

It is their ready-to-wear collections that are available to a wider audience, adding a

splash of glamour and the feel of haute

couture to more wardrobes.

The 1960s also featured a revolt against established fashion

standards by mods, rockers, and hippies, as well as an increasing

internationalization of the fashion scene. Jet travel had spawned a jet set

that partied—and shopped—just as happily in New York as in Paris. Rich women

no longer felt that a Paris dress was necessarily better than one sewn elsewhere.

While Paris is still pre-eminent in the fashion world, it is no

longer the sole arbiter of fashion.

Couture Samples:

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L’Histoire de Mode #1~Shoulder Pads

 

Shoulder Pads In Time

Shoulder pads are a type of fabric-covered padding used in men’s and women’s clothing to give the wearer the illusion of having broader and less sloping shoulders. In men’s styles, shoulder pads are often used in suits, jackets and overcoats, usually sewn at the top of the shoulder and fastened between the lining and the outer fabric layer. In women’s clothing, their inclusion depends on the fashions of the day. Their use is particularly associated with clothing of the early 1940s and the 1980s. Although from a non-fashion point of view they are generally for people with narrow or sloping shoulders, there are also quite a few cases in which shoulder pads will be necessary for a suit or blazer in order to compensate for certain fabrics’ natural properties, most notably suede blazers, due to the weight of the material.

1930

Shoulder pads originally became popular for women in the 1930s when

fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli included them in her designs of 1931, and the following

year Joan Crawford wore them in the film “Letty Lynton”. In the beginning, they were shaped

as a semicircle or small triangle, and were stuffed with wool, cotton or sawdust. They were

positioned at the top of the sleeve, to extend the shoulder line. A good example of this

is their use in “leg o’ mutton” sleeves, or the smaller puffed sleeves which were revived at

this time, and based on styles from the 1890s.

1940

After World War II began in 1939, women’s fashions became increasingly militarised.

Jackets and coats in particular were influenced by masculine styles and shoulder pads became bulkier and were

positioned at the top of the shoulder to create a solid look. Dresses too were made with shoulder pads;

soon the style was universal, found in all garments excepting lingerie but tapering off later in the

decade after the war was over and women yearned for a softer, more feminine look.

During the late 1940s to about 1951, some dresses featured a soft, smaller shoulder pad with

so little padding as to be barely noticeable. Its function seems to have been to slightly shape the shoulder line.

1950-1960

During the 1950s and 1960s small padded shoulder pads appeared only

in women’s jackets and coats—not in dresses, knitwear or blouses as

they had previously during the heyday of the early 1940s.

1970

Shoulder pads made their next appearance in women’s clothing in the early 1970s,

through the influence of British fashion designer Barbara Hulanicki and her label Biba.

Biba produced designs influenced by the styles of the 1930s and 1940s, and so a soft version

of the shoulder pad was revived. Ossie Clark was another London designer using shoulder

pads at the time. These styles did not, however, reach mainstream acceptance, and

so the popularity was relatively short lived.

1980

During the early 1980s there was a resurgence of interest in the ladies’ evening wear styles of the

early 1940s: peplums, batwing sleeves and other design elements of the times were re-interpreted for a new market.

The shoulder pad helped define the silhouette and was reintroduced in cut foam versions, especially

in well-cut suits reminiscent of the WWII era. Before too long, these masculinized shapes were adopted by women

seeking success in the corporate world and became an icon of women’s attempts to smash the

glass ceiling, a mission that was added by their notable appearance in the TV series Dynasty.

As the decade wore on, shoulder pads became the defining fashion statement of the era, known

as power dressing and bestowing the perception of status and position onto those who wore them. They became

both larger and more ubiquitous—every garment from the brassiere upwards would come with its own

set of shoulder pads. To prevent excessive shoulder padding, velcro was sewn onto the pads so that

the wearer could choose how many sets to wear. By the end of the era, some shoulder pads

were the size of dinner plates. It was inevitable that as the cycle of fashion

turned, they would lose favour in the early 1990s.

1990

The shoulder pad fashion carried over from the late 1980s with some popularity in the

early 1990s, but tastes were changing. Some designers continued to produce ranges featuring

shoulder pads into the mid-1990s, as shoulder pads were prominent in women’s formal

suits, and matching top-bottom attire, highly exampled in The Nanny. but the marketplace had

spoken—the styles now looked out of date and were shunned by the young and fashion-conscious.

Appearances were reduced to smaller, subtler versions augmenting the

shoulder lines of jackets and coats.

2000

In the late 2000s, a resurgence of shoulder pads appeared on many runways, fashion

designer collections and became mainstream among many people who were interested in

fashion. By the 2009-2010 seasons shoulder pads had made there way in

the mainstream market again. In 2010 many retailers

like Wal-Mart had shoulder pads on at

least half of all womens tops

and blouses.

Modern Samples: