Fashion Blog site about my line & opinions

Posts tagged “Couture

S/S 2012 Mini-Collection Coming soon!!

Here are a few of the looks I previewed at a concert in Brooklyn. The jewelry will be posted soon.


These are only a few of the pieces that premiered at the concert. All accessories worn were also made by 1930by ChrisJackson.

Please leave your feedback. It’s much needed & appreciated.


Quote of the Day: 10 March ’11~Donna Karan

“Today, fashion is really about sensuality—how a woman feels on the inside. In the ’80s women used suits with exaggerated shoulders and waists to make a strong impression. Women are now more comfortable with themselves and their bodies—they no longer feel the need to hide behind their clothes.”~Donna Karan

 

Born Donna Ivy Faske, Karan is an American fashion designer and the creator of the Donna Karan New York and DKNY clothing labels


MORENA PEREZ, has been announced WINNER!!

 

Congratulations to Morena Perez!! You won the first ever 1930giveaway jewelry contest! E-mail us at 1930bychrisjackson@gmail.com to claim your gifts.

Thank you ALL for participating in our first ever contest. Keep coming back for more contest where we giveaway jewelry, clothes, bags, & possibly SHOES!!

~Thanks~

Chris J.


ALMOST THERE!! 1930 VIEWS CONTEST CLOSING SOON!!

CLICK PHOTO FOR DETAILS.

ONCE THE SITE VIEW IS AT 1930 CONTEST IS OVER!

ENTER FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN FREE JEWELRY DESIGNED BY US UNDER OUR SHOP PAGE.

**More contests coming soon!**


L’Histoire de Mode~Haute Couture

Haute Couture

Haute couture (French for “high sewing” or “high dressmaking”) refers to the creation

of exclusive custom-fitted clothing. Haute couture is made to order for a specific customer,

and it is usually made from high-quality, expensive fabric and sewn with extreme attention

to detail and finished by the most experienced and capable seamstresses, often using

time-consuming, hand-executed techniques. Couture is a common abbreviation

of haute couture and refers to the same thing in spirit.

It originally referred to Englishman Charles Frederick Worth’s

work, produced in Paris in the mid-nineteenth century. In modern

France, haute couture is a “protected name” that can be used

only by firms that meet certain well-defined standards. However,

the term is also used loosely to describe all high-fashion custom-fitted

clothing, whether it is produced in Paris or in other fashion capitals such as

Milan, London, New York and Tokyo.

In France, the term haute couture is protected by law and is defined by

the Chambre de commerce et d’industrie de Paris based in Paris, France.

Their rules state that only “those companies mentioned on the list drawn up each year

by a commission domiciled at the Ministry for Industry are entitled to avail themselves”

of the label haute couture. The criteria for haute couture were established in 1945 and

updated in 1992. To earn the right to call itself a couture house and to use the term

haute couture in its advertising and any other way, members of the

Chambre syndicale de la haute couture must follow these rules:

  • Design made-to-order for private clients, with one or more fittings.
  • Have a workshop (atelier) in Paris that employs at least fifteen people full-time.
  • Each season (i.e., twice a year), present a collection to the Paris press, comprising at least thirty-five runs/exits with outfits for both daytime wear and evening wear.

However, the term haute couture may have been misused by

ready-to-wear brands since the late 1980s, so that its true meaning

may have become blurred with that of prêt-à-porter (the French term for

ready-to-wear fashion) in the public perception. Every haute couture house also

markets prêt-à-porter collections, which typically deliver a higher return on investment

than their custom clothing . Falling revenues have forced a few couture

houses to abandon their less profitable couture division and concentrate

solely on the less prestigious prêt-à-porter. These houses, such as

Italian designer Roberto Capucci, all of whom have their

workshops in Italy, are no longer

considered haute couture.

Many top designer fashion houses, such as Chanel, use the word for

some of their special collections. These collections are often not for sale or they

are very difficult to purchase. Sometimes, “haute couture” is inappropriately used to

label non-dressmaking activities, such as fine art, music and more.

French leadership in European fashion may date from the

18th century, when the art, architecture, music, and fashions

of the French court at Versailles were imitated across Europe. Visitors

to Paris brought back clothing that was then copied by local dressmakers.

Stylish women also ordered fashion dolls dressed in the latest Parisian fashion

to serve as models. As railroads and steamships made European travel easier,

it was increasingly common for wealthy women to travel to Paris to shop for clothing

and accessories. French fitters and dressmakers were commonly thought to be the best

in Europe, and real Parisian garments were considered better than local imitations.

The couturier Charles Frederick Worth (October 13, 1826–March 10, 1895),

is widely considered the father of haute couture as it is known today. Although

born in Bourne, Lincolnshire, England, Worth made his mark in the French

fashion industry. Revolutionizing how dressmaking had been previously perceived,

Worth made it so the dressmaker became the artist of garnishment: a fashion designer.

While he created one-of-a-kind designs to please some of his titled or wealthy customers,

he is best known for preparing a portfolio of designs that were shown on live models at the

House of Worth. Clients selected one model, specified colors and fabrics, and had a

duplicate garment tailor-made in Worth’s workshop. Worth combined individual

tailoring with a standardization more characteristic of the ready-to-wear clothing industry,

which was also developing during this period.

Following in Worth’s footsteps were Callot Soeurs, Patou,

Poiret, Vionnet, Fortuny, Lanvin, Chanel, Mainbocher, Schiaparelli,

Balenciaga, and Dior. Some of these fashion houses still exist today, under

the leadership of modern designers.

In the 1960s a group of young designers who had trained under

men like Dior and Balenciaga left these established couture houses and opened their

own establishments. The most successful of these young designers were Yves Saint Laurent,

Pierre Cardin, André Courrèges, and Emanuel Ungaro. Japanese native and Paris-based

Hanae Mori was also successful in establishing her own line.

Lacroix is one of the fashion houses to have been started in

the late 20th century. Other new houses have included Jean-Paul Gaultier

and Thierry Mugler. Due to the high expenses of producing haute couture

collections, Lacroix and Mugler have since ceased

their haute couture activities.

For all these fashion houses, custom clothing is no longer the main source of

income, often costing much more than it earns through direct sales; it only adds the a

ura of fashion to their ventures in ready-to-wear clothing and related luxury products

such as shoes and perfumes, and licensing ventures that earn greater

returns for the company. Excessive commercialization and profit-making can be

damaging, however. Cardin, for example, licensed with abandon in the 1980s and his name

lost most of its fashionable cachet when anyone could buy Cardin luggage at a discount store.

It is their ready-to-wear collections that are available to a wider audience, adding a

splash of glamour and the feel of haute

couture to more wardrobes.

The 1960s also featured a revolt against established fashion

standards by mods, rockers, and hippies, as well as an increasing

internationalization of the fashion scene. Jet travel had spawned a jet set

that partied—and shopped—just as happily in New York as in Paris. Rich women

no longer felt that a Paris dress was necessarily better than one sewn elsewhere.

While Paris is still pre-eminent in the fashion world, it is no

longer the sole arbiter of fashion.

Couture Samples:


Quote of the Day: 7 Feb. ’11~Jean-Paul Gaultier

“It’s always the badly dressed people who are the most interesting.”~Jean Paul Gaultier



L’Histoire de Mode #2~Fashion Week

 

 

Fashion Week History

In 1943, the first New York Fashion Week was held,

with one main purpose: to distract attention from French

fashion during WWII, when workers in the fashion industry

were unable to travel to Paris. This was an opportune

moment – as for centuries designers in America were thought

to be reliant on the French for inspiration. The fashion

publicist Eleanor Lambert organized an event she called

‘Press Week’ to showcase American designers for fashion journalists,

who had previously ignored their works. The Press Week was a success,

and, as a result, magazines like Vogue (which were normally filled with

French designs) began to feature more and more American innovations.

Until 1994, shows were held in different locations, such as hotels, or lofts.

Eventually, after a structural accident at a Michael Kors show, the event

moved to Bryant Park, behind the New York Public Library, where it remained

until 2010, when the shows relocated to Lincoln Center. However, long before

Lambert, there were fashion shows throughout America. In 1903, an NYC shop, called

Ehrich Brothers, put on what is thought to have been the country’s first fashion show,

to lure middle-class females into the store. By 1910, many big department stores

were holding shows of their own.

It is likely that American retailers saw that they were called

‘fashion parades’ in Paris couture salons and decided to use the idea.

These parades were an effective way to promote stores, and improved

their status. By the 1920s, the fashion show had been used by retailers

up and down the country. They were staged, and often held in the shop’s

restaurant during lunch or teatime. These shows were usually more theatrical

than those of today, heavily based upon a single theme, and accompanied

with a narrative commentary. The shows were hugely popular, enticing

crowds in their thousands – crowds so large, that stores in New York in the

fifties had to obtain a license to have live models. Nowadays, access to

New York Fashion Week is by invitation only, and only fashion magazine

editors, fashion magazine journalists, models (and ex-models)

and celebrities are invited.

Other buyers are restricted to the showrooms and stores, and the

articles in the magazines. The dominance of the big four has been

criticised for benefiting industry participants. For example, buyers,

journalists, models and celebrities can limit their travel and simply move

from one city to the other over the four week period. This arrangement

has been criticized for stifling manufacturing employment in the UK

and design talent in emerging fashion hubs such as Los Angeles.

 

Fashion Week Schedule

New York, London, Milan and Paris each host a fashion week twice a year with

New York kicking off each season and the other cities following in the

aforementioned order.

There are two major seasons per year – Autumn/Winter and Spring/Summer.

For Womenswear, the Autumn/Winter shows always start in

New York in February. Spring/Summer shows start in September

in London. Menswear Autumn/Winter shows start in January in Milan

for typically less than a week followed by another short week in Paris.

Menswear Spring/Summer shows are done in June. Womenswear Haute

Couture shows typically happen in Paris a week after

the Menswear Paris shows.

Over the past few years, more and more designers have shown

inter-seasonal collections between the traditional Autumn/Winter and Spring/Summer seasons.

These collections are usually more commercial than the main season collections and

help shorten the customer’s wait for new season clothes. The inter-seasonal

collections are Resort/Cruise (before Spring/Summer) and Pre-Fall (before Autumn/Winter).

There is no fixed schedule for these shows in any of the major fashion capitals but

they typically happen three months after the main season shows. Some designers show

their inter-seasonal collections outside their home city. For example, Karl Lagerfeld

has shown his Resort and Pre-Fall collections for Chanel in cities such

as Moscow, Los Angeles and Monte Carlo instead of Paris. Many designers

also put on presentations as opposed to traditional shows during Resort and

Pre-Fall either to cut down costs or because they feel the clothes

can be better understood in this medium.

Some fashion weeks can be genre-specific, such as a

Miami Fashion Week (swimwear), Rio Summer (swimwear),

Prêt-a-Porter (ready-to-wear) Fashion Week, Couture

(one-of-a-kind designer original) Fashion Week and Bridal

Fashion Week, while Portland (Oregon, USA) Fashion Week

shows some eco-friendly designers.


This or That ~ Feel free to commment

Leather European fetish boots circa 1900

or

Stella McCartney's stretch over boot, Christian Louboutin's black suede boot, & a pair from Delman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 1900 Leather fetish boots take the cake in my opinion.

Sure the heel is not that sexy but come on, they don’t make

boots like this anymore: velvet lined boots, hand crafted

wooden heels, and leather molded on a real woman’s leg

to make a perfect fit. Plus they’re freaking amazing, I have a

shoe fetish now!!

Opinions always welcome, I will respond as soon as I see them posted!