Fashion Blog site about my line & opinions

Archive for February 4, 2011

CHECKOUT OUR JEWELRY PAGE

 

 

Checkout the jewelry page for clear views of each piece! Some pieces are unique to this season.

If certain pieces are ordered enough, then they will become staples.

Give us your opinions.


L’Histoire de Mode #2~Fashion Week

 

 

Fashion Week History

In 1943, the first New York Fashion Week was held,

with one main purpose: to distract attention from French

fashion during WWII, when workers in the fashion industry

were unable to travel to Paris. This was an opportune

moment – as for centuries designers in America were thought

to be reliant on the French for inspiration. The fashion

publicist Eleanor Lambert organized an event she called

‘Press Week’ to showcase American designers for fashion journalists,

who had previously ignored their works. The Press Week was a success,

and, as a result, magazines like Vogue (which were normally filled with

French designs) began to feature more and more American innovations.

Until 1994, shows were held in different locations, such as hotels, or lofts.

Eventually, after a structural accident at a Michael Kors show, the event

moved to Bryant Park, behind the New York Public Library, where it remained

until 2010, when the shows relocated to Lincoln Center. However, long before

Lambert, there were fashion shows throughout America. In 1903, an NYC shop, called

Ehrich Brothers, put on what is thought to have been the country’s first fashion show,

to lure middle-class females into the store. By 1910, many big department stores

were holding shows of their own.

It is likely that American retailers saw that they were called

‘fashion parades’ in Paris couture salons and decided to use the idea.

These parades were an effective way to promote stores, and improved

their status. By the 1920s, the fashion show had been used by retailers

up and down the country. They were staged, and often held in the shop’s

restaurant during lunch or teatime. These shows were usually more theatrical

than those of today, heavily based upon a single theme, and accompanied

with a narrative commentary. The shows were hugely popular, enticing

crowds in their thousands – crowds so large, that stores in New York in the

fifties had to obtain a license to have live models. Nowadays, access to

New York Fashion Week is by invitation only, and only fashion magazine

editors, fashion magazine journalists, models (and ex-models)

and celebrities are invited.

Other buyers are restricted to the showrooms and stores, and the

articles in the magazines. The dominance of the big four has been

criticised for benefiting industry participants. For example, buyers,

journalists, models and celebrities can limit their travel and simply move

from one city to the other over the four week period. This arrangement

has been criticized for stifling manufacturing employment in the UK

and design talent in emerging fashion hubs such as Los Angeles.

 

Fashion Week Schedule

New York, London, Milan and Paris each host a fashion week twice a year with

New York kicking off each season and the other cities following in the

aforementioned order.

There are two major seasons per year – Autumn/Winter and Spring/Summer.

For Womenswear, the Autumn/Winter shows always start in

New York in February. Spring/Summer shows start in September

in London. Menswear Autumn/Winter shows start in January in Milan

for typically less than a week followed by another short week in Paris.

Menswear Spring/Summer shows are done in June. Womenswear Haute

Couture shows typically happen in Paris a week after

the Menswear Paris shows.

Over the past few years, more and more designers have shown

inter-seasonal collections between the traditional Autumn/Winter and Spring/Summer seasons.

These collections are usually more commercial than the main season collections and

help shorten the customer’s wait for new season clothes. The inter-seasonal

collections are Resort/Cruise (before Spring/Summer) and Pre-Fall (before Autumn/Winter).

There is no fixed schedule for these shows in any of the major fashion capitals but

they typically happen three months after the main season shows. Some designers show

their inter-seasonal collections outside their home city. For example, Karl Lagerfeld

has shown his Resort and Pre-Fall collections for Chanel in cities such

as Moscow, Los Angeles and Monte Carlo instead of Paris. Many designers

also put on presentations as opposed to traditional shows during Resort and

Pre-Fall either to cut down costs or because they feel the clothes

can be better understood in this medium.

Some fashion weeks can be genre-specific, such as a

Miami Fashion Week (swimwear), Rio Summer (swimwear),

Prêt-a-Porter (ready-to-wear) Fashion Week, Couture

(one-of-a-kind designer original) Fashion Week and Bridal

Fashion Week, while Portland (Oregon, USA) Fashion Week

shows some eco-friendly designers.


Quote of the Day: 4 Feb. ’11~Virginia Woolf

“There is much to support the view that it is clothes that wear us and not we them; we may make them take the mould of arm or breast, but they would mould our hearts, our brains, our tongues to their liking.”~Virginia Woolf

Woolf was an English author, essayist, publisher, and writer of short stories, regarded as one of the foremost modernist literary figures of the twentieth century.


CHECKOUT THE SHOP PAGE

 


Don’t Forget to Check Out Our SHOP Page!! All Jewelry is handmade by myself using Hemps, Leathers, Feathers, & Stones! Everything is under $30!!

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L’Histoire de Mode #1~Stiletto

 

 

Stiletto Heels

A stiletto heel is a long, thin, high heel found on some boots and shoes, usually for

women. It is named after the stiletto dagger, the phrase being first recorded in the early 1930s.

Stiletto heels may vary in length from 2.5 centimetres (1 inch) to 25 cm (10 inches) or more if a

platform sole is used, and are sometimes defined as having a diameter at the ground of

less than 1 cm (slightly less than half an inch). Stiletto-style heels 5 cm or shorter are called

kitten heels. Not all high slim heels merit the description stiletto. The extremely slender

original Italian-style stiletto heels of the late 1950s and very early 1960s were no more

than 5mm in diameter for much of their length, although the heel sometimes

flared out a little at the top-piece (tip). After their demise in the mid-late 1960s,

such slender heels were difficult to find until recently due to changes in the way

heels were mass-produced. A real stiletto heel has a stem of solid steel or alloy. The

more usual method of mass-producing high shoe heels, i.e. moulded plastic with an

internal metal tube for reinforcement, does not

achieve the true stiletto shape.

Relatively thin high heels were certainly around in the late 19th

century, as numerous fetish drawings attest. Firm photographic

evidence exists in the form of photographs of Parisian singer Mistinguett

from the 1940s. These shoes were designed by Andre Perugia, who began

designing shoes in 1906. It seems unlikely that he invented the stiletto, but

he is probably the first firmly documented designer of the high, slim heel. The

word stiletto is derived from stylus, meaning a pin or stalk. Its usage in footwear

first appeared in print in the New Statesman magazine in 1959: “She came …forward,

her walk made lopsided by the absence of one heel of the stilettos”.

High heel shoes were worn by men and women courtiers. The design of the

stiletto heel originally came from the late Kristin S. Wagner but would

not become popular until the late 1950s. The stiletto heel came with the advent of

technology using a supporting metal shaft or stem embedded into the heel, instead

of wood or other, weaker materials that required a wide heel. This revival of the

opulent heel style can be attributed to the designer Roger Vivier and such designs

became very popular in the 1950s.

As time went on, stiletto heels became known more for their erotic

nature than for their ability to make height. Stiletto heels are a common

fetish item. As a fashion item, their popularity was changing over time.

After an initial wave of popularity in the 1950s, they reached their most refined

shape in the early 1960s, when the toes of the shoes which bore them became as

slender and elongated as the stiletto heels themselves. As a result of the overall sharpness

of outline, it was customary for women to refer to the whole shoe as a “stiletto”, not

just the heel, via synecdoche (pars pro toto). Although they officially faded from the

scene after the Beatle era began, their popularity continued at street level, and women

stubbornly refused to give them up even after they could no longer readily find them in

the mainstream shops.

A version of the stiletto heel was reintroduced as soon as 1974

by Manolo Blahnik, who dubbed his “new” heel the Needle. Similar heels were stocked at

the big Biba store in London, by Russell and Bromley and by smaller boutiques. Old,

unsold stocks of pointed-toe stilettos, and contemporary efforts to replicate

them (lacking the true stiletto heel because of changes in the way heels

were by then being mass-produced) were sold in street fashion markets

and became popular with punks, and with other fashion “tribes” of the

late 1970s until supplies of the inspirational original styles dwindled in

the early 1980s. Subsequently, round-toe shoes with slightly thicker

(sometimes cone-shaped) semi-stiletto heels, often very high in an attempt

to convey slenderness (the best example of this being the shoes sold in

London by Derber), were frequently worn at the office with

wide-shouldered power suits.

The style survived through much

of the 1980s but almost completely disappeared during the 1990s,

when professional and college-age women took to wearing shoes

with thick, block heels. However, the slender stiletto heel staged

a major comeback after 2000, when young women adopted

the style for dressing up office wear or adding a feminine

touch to casual wear, like jeans. Stiletto heels are particularly

associated with the image of the femme fatale. They are often

considered to be a seductive item of clothing, and often

feature in popular culture.

Stilettos give the optical illusion of a longer, slimmer leg, a smaller foot,

and a greater overall height. They also alter the wearer’s posture and gait,

flexing the calf muscles, and making the

bust and buttocks more

prominent.

All high heels counter the natural functionality of the foot,

which can create skeleton/muscular problems if they are worn

excessively. Stiletto heels are no exception, but some people assume

that because they are thinner they must be worse for you. In fact, they are

safer to wear than the other extreme of high heel fashion, the platform shoe.

Despite their impracticality, their popularity remains undiminished – as Terry

DeHavilland (UK shoe designer) has said, “people say they’re bad for the

feet but they’re good for the mind. What’s more important?”

Stiletto heels concentrate a large amount of force into a small area.

The great pressure under such a heel (greater than that under the feet of an elephant.)

can cause damage to carpets and floors. The stiletto heel will also sink into soft

ground, making it impractical for

outdoor wear on grass.

Samples:

Ed Hardy

Dior

Jimmy Choo, Cole Haan, Sergio Rossi, Burberry, Louboutin, Guess, MIA, Madden

Balenciaga

Ducati

DeSquared F/W 10 (look familiar?)